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Camping with Pets

Hiking the Appalachian Trail with your mastiff, Max, or RV'ing across the country with your poodle, Polly - we all love our pets and want to find ways to share our passion for camping with them. We'll share stories of camping pets and tips for keeping your pets safe, comfortable, and happy - on the road and in the outdoors.

 

Find more great information about camping and RVing with pets at PetCamping.com

Take A Walk with your Dog

If you’re looking for a great activity to do with your furry friend, why not sign up for a dog walk? These fun events are held all across the country throughout the year, providing dogs and their people with a great chance to socialize. And dog walks are usually held to fund a good cause, so you can feel proud of your contribution!

It’s no secret that dogs love walking, and they especially like walking in the company of other dogs. Socializing is an important part of dog life, from sniffing and greeting to romping around with new friends. Help your dogs expand their mind by introducing them to new smells, new people, and new canine companions.

Dog walks have plenty to interest people as well. Aside from the fun and healthy benefits of walking, you’ll see tons of dogs, maybe even breeds you’ve never spotted before. Many dog walks include special contests like Frisbee throws, races, look-alike contests, and best trick contests. There might be a fair with pet-related vendors and snacks for humans and canines. Even if you don’t have a dog, you’ll probably be welcome at any dog walk.

Dog walks have plenty to interest people as well. Aside from the fun and healthy benefits of walking, you’ll see tons of dogs, maybe even breeds you’ve never spotted before. Many dog walks include special contests like Frisbee throws, races, look-alike contests, and best trick contests. There might be a fair with pet-related vendors and snacks for humans and canines. Even if you don’t have a dog, you’ll probably be welcome at any dog walk.

If you’re worried about how your dog will behave at the dog walk, consider building up to the big event over the preceding weeks. If it’s socializing that has you worried, do everything you can to get your dog around other dogs, whether it’s through walks in town, visits to the dog-park, or trips to a dog-friendly pet store. The more interaction your pet has with others, the better equipped they’ll be to meet the crowds at the dog walk. In a large social situation, most dog owners find that their pets are better behaved than they expected. The dog world has its social etiquette, too!

Maybe your worry isn’t socializing, it’s pulling on the leash. If your dog pulls, you have a few good remedies available. Ideally, you’ll solve the problem through a combination of training, rewards, and equipment. Let’s start with the equipment. Choke chains are no longer so popular among dog trainers, many of whom have switched to harnesses, “noose” collars,” or Gentle Leaders that fasten around a dog’s head. If you choose a harness, be sure to work especially hard on training. Harnesses are very humane, but a dog in a harness can pull just as hard as one in a regular collar, perhaps harder. The noose collar will provide control, but is still fairly gentle. Gentle Leaders are effective because they attach around a dog’s head and nose, so it can’t pull as hard on the leash.

To train your dog to stop pulling, start in an everyday place, like the living room or right outside. Walks are too exciting and distracting to be good places for training. You’ll need to start in a place where your dog can focus and pay attention. To begin, every time your dog tries to pull you forward, stop moving. If your dog pulls again, give the leash a gentle tug and use a standard phrase like “no pull.” It’s important that you pick one phrase that means “don’t pull” and use it consistently. If your dog tugs again, use a loud, low voice to say “no pull,” and accompany it by a sharp yank on the leash. This yank should be firm and quick. Every time your dog tugs, repeat the words and the yank.

When your dog is walking nicely without tugging, be sure to give lots of praise. If you’re using a nylon mesh leash, you could have a policy of only moving forward when the leash is slack. Praise the dog and move forward. If they’re eager to go, they’ll pick up the rules of the game quickly. If you’re using a retractable leash, you can’t use slackness as a guide. Instead, praise your dog when they aren’t tugging, and move forward, then rely on the repeated phrase and the quick yank for correction.

This month, hundreds of dog walkers will take to roads, paths, and trails all over the country in support of dog welfare organizations. You and your furry friends can take part in special doggy dashes, walk-a-thons, cake walks, and doggy fashion shows, all for a good cause. Or was that for a good paws?
Looking for more information and other great articles about camping with pets? Visit PetCamping.com